Circe, Hecate, and Lilith: Same Goddess and How They Relate to the Dark Moon in Astrology

full-moon-2016_05_14-02_02_56-utcHaving studied astrology since the age of 12, and along with my being a practicing solitary witch since the mid-eighties, has drawn me to learn and observe as much as I can about the asteroid goddesses in astrology. How can they best be used and understood? Well, today I’m taking a strong look in my astrological microscope at the topic of the Dark Moon. To note, the Dark Moon in astrology is often linked to the ancient Hebrew original independent woman, Lilith, the first wife of Adam. Well, after studying the Dark Moon for quite some time, I propose the inclusion of the following deities to be incorporated into what we know as the Dark/Black Moon. However, I’ll allow you the reader to decide such for yourself.

First, let me introduce you to the goddesses/deities of which I refer…

circe-offering-the-cup-to-ulysses-2016_05_14-02_02_56-utcCirce:
Circe was a powerful sorceress—variously described as a goddess, nymph, or witch—in Greek myth and legend. By most accounts, Circe was the daughter of Helios: Titan of the Sun and Perse the Oceanid. Her brothers were Aeetes, the keeper of the Golden Fleece, and Perses. Her sister was Pasiphaë, the wife of King Minos and mother of the Minotaur. Other accounts make her the daughter of Hecate, the goddess of witchcraft herself.

 

Circe was renowned for her vast knowledge of potions and herbs. Through the use of magical potions and a wand or a staff, she transformed her enemies, or those who offended her, into animals. Some say she was exiled to the solitary island of Aeaea by her subjects and her father for ending the life of her husband, the prince of Colchis. Later traditions tell of her leaving or even destroying the island and moving to Italy, where she was identified with Cape Circeo.

hecate-2016_05_14-02_02_56-utcHecate:
Hecate or Hekate is a goddess in Ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding two torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery. She appears in the Homeric Hymn to Demeter and in Hesiod’s Theogony, where she is promoted strongly as a great goddess. The place of origin of her following is uncertain, but it is thought that she had popular followings in Thrace. She was one of the main deities worshiped in Athenian households as a protective goddess and one who bestowed prosperity and daily blessings on the family. In the post-Christian writings of the Chaldean Oracles (2nd–3rd century CE) she was regarded with (some) rulership over earth, sea and sky, as well as a more universal role as Savior (Soteira), Mother of Angels and the Cosmic World Soul. Regarding the nature of her cult, it has been remarked, “she is more at home on the fringes than in the center of Greek polytheism. Intrinsically ambivalent and polymorphous, she straddles conventional boundaries and eludes definition.”

lilith2-2016_05_14-02_02_56-utcLilith:
Lilith is a figure in Jewish mythology, developed earliest in the Babylonian Talmud (3rd to 5th centuries CE). The character is generally thought to derive in part from a historically far earlier class of female demons (lilītu) in Mesopotamian religion, found in cuneiform texts of Sumer, Akkad, Assyria, and Babylonia.

Evidence in later Jewish materials is plentiful, but little information has survived relating to the original Sumerian, Akkadian, Assyrian and Babylonian view of these demons. While the connection is almost universally agreed upon, recent scholarship has disputed the relevance of two sources previously used to connect the Jewish lilith to an Akkadian lilītu—the Gilgamesh appendix and the Arslan Tash amulets.

In Hebrew-language texts, the term lilith or lilit (translated as “night creatures”, “night monster”, “night hag”, or “screech owl”) first occurs in a list of animals in Isaiah 34:11, either in singular or plural form according to variations in the earliest manuscripts. In the Dead Sea Scrolls’ Songs of the Sage the term first occurs in a list of monsters. In Jewish magical inscriptions on bowls and amulets from the 6th century CE onwards, Lilith is identified as a female demon and the first visual depictions appear.

In Jewish folklore, from the satirical book Alphabet of Ben Sira (ca 700–1000 CE) onwards, Lilith appears as Adam’s first wife, who was created at the same time (Rosh Hashanah) and from the same dirt as Adam – compare Genesis 1:27. (This contrasts with Eve, who was created from one of Adam’s ribs: Genesis 2:22) The legend developed extensively during the Middle Ages, in the tradition of Aggadic midrashim, the Zohar, and Jewish mysticism. For example, in the 13th-century writings of Rabbi Isaac ben Jacob ha-Cohen, Lilith left Adam after she refused to become subservient to him and then would not return to the Garden of Eden after she had coupled with the archangel Samael. The resulting Lilith legend continues to serve as source material in modern Western culture, literature, occultism, fantasy, and horror.

Now, with the introductions and a bit of historical reference about these ladies out of the way, let us now discuss…

The Dark Moon in Astrology:
Dark Moon, Black Moon or Lilith (and/or any of the aforementioned deities above), is a hypothetical point in astrology is known by several names. Some argue that the Dark Moon is one thing, Black Moon another and Lilith yet another. The reality is that there is an asteroid named Lilith, but it is not the same as the Dark or Black Moon. However, when used as a point in a birthchart, all names appear valid as they all seem to describe the same.

This point arises due to the Moon’s path around the ecliptic forming an axis of the perigee when the moon’s orbit is closest to the earth and the apogee when its orbit is furthest from the earth. It is an empty area, a void created, an empty focus. Moving at about 40 degrees a year, the perigee is from where the path of the Dark Moon is calculated. It takes a little under nine years for it to complete its course.

In astrology, the Dark Moon is representative of the darker side of our nature, the negative side. It is the hidden depths that we know exist yet we prefer not to acknowledge. It is subtle on the surface, yet profound beneath. It is the foundations of our personality and the shocking truth that we often deny and project onto others instead. The refusal to see what is really within ourselves. The subtle refusal to see what part we may have played in some unpleasant drama of our lives, how we ourselves have manifested our fears. It is the kind of thing that we intrinsically know we have to deal with, confront the darker side in order to progress unhindered, yet most often we try to ignore. It is the deeper truth that we are forever in search of within ourselves. Probably the best use we can make of the dark moon is to explore our hidden depths, realise that we all have that darker side and go within to resolve that which ultimately hinders us.

The Dark Moon is representative of the negative traits of guilt, shame, hatred, envy, and vengefulness, often brought about by personal wounds and hurts. The true dark side of things we try to hide.

There is another side of the Dark Moon astrologically. Carl G. Jung, the famous psychoanalyst described something that he called the “anima”. The anima is a man’s image of the ideal woman and also the feminine side of his personality. For a woman it is the image of the ideal man and the masculine side of her personality. So the dark moon in a birthchart will represent these ideals too.

It is also representative of the enchantress or the seducer, one who lures another by use of sexuality or devious means. The kind who tempts another by implying that the grass is greener on the other side, that they can “rescue” someone, but it is in reality for their own selfish gain.

The Dark Moon, Lilith (and her likely other aliases), also has associations with motherhood, like her counterpart the Moon. With Lilith however, the instinctive nurturing is replaced by a strong protection of her offspring to the point that she would kill if necessary any that threatened them or caused them harm. She is also reactive against the ties involved with motherhood and the emptiness that mothers sometimes feel by isolation and the perceived lack of individuality that accompanies it.  These things do not only apply to women, they apply to men as well, as the Black Moon is also their feminine side.

Keywords: danger, darkness, deceit, destruction, devious, devouring, dreams, emptiness, enchantress, envy, fears, guilt, hatred, imagination, isolation, jealousy, magic, marriage-wrecker, mystery, night, poison, secrets, seduction, shame, the “other woman” who thinks a man needs rescuing from the “chains” of his partner, vengefulness.

The manner in which the Dark Moon plays out will be of the character of the sign in which it is posited and with over tones of the ruling planet of that sign. For example, if your Dark Moon is in Aries, it will act in the manner of Aries with overtones of Mars.

Source: Wikipedia (references of the goddesses mentioned)

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